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Welcome to the Not In Our State Summit 2015 at the University of Montana in beautiful Missoula, Montana. 
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Sunday, November 8
 

6:00pm

The Hunting Ground

Recording artist Jamie Wyman performs her original music followed by a free screening of The Hunting Ground, to be followed by a panel discussion featuring The Hunting Ground Director Kirby Dick. 


 
Monday, November 9
 

8:00am

Continental Breakfast
Continental breakfast will be provided for attendees who registered at least 72 hours in advance of the summit.

9:00am

Alcohol and Sexual Assault: Unpacking the Connections and Practical Implications for Prevention
Session Description: The strong and varied connections between student alcohol use and sexual assault will be presented, highlighting the critical need and myriad opportunities to shift the focus from victim behavior to perpetrator accountability. This will be followed by strategies underscoring the importance of collaborative and mutually reinforcing prevention efforts between alcohol and sexual assault prevention practitioners.

Learning Outcomes: As a result of the training, participants will be able to: - understand existing and emerging research associating alcohol use and sexual assault - recall factors related to alcohol's role in sexual assault perpetration and victimization - speak to the vast and varied dynamics related to alcohol's relationship to sexual assault - employ co-curricular prevention strategies to address alcohol and sexual assault

Speakers
RB

Robert Buelow, Vice President, Higher Education Partner Education at EverFi

Robert Buelow, Vice President, Higher Education Partner Education at EverFi


Monday November 9, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
UC 326

9:00am

Boxed In: How Constricting Gender Roles Perpetuate Rape Culture
Session Description: Workshop Approach: NCBI workshops are experiential and participatory and help participants identify and reduce prejudicial attitudes to become leaders in ending individual and institutional mistreatment and discrimination. The workshops are hopeful and positive in tone, and build community among participants while deepening skills and empowering leadership. Workshop Content: This session will offer an exploration of social constructions of gender and the ways in which harmful gender stereotypes contribute to rape culture. Gender is the behavioral, cultural,or psychological traits associated with a certain sex. These traits are often assigned by society through media messages, family values, school curriculum and more. Gender affects the messages people receive surrounding relationships and sex. Stereotypes form and gender policing occurs along with those messages and creates contradicting expectations of sexual encounters. These expectations can contribute to unclear consent or lack of consent altogether. Enforcing constricting gender roles perpetuates rape culture. It is our hope that through this session we can facilitate a dialogue on gender roles and the connection to rape culture as well as impart skills to respond to gender policing and rape culture. Draft Plan for Session: This interactive training will use a variety of learning modalities including: interactive, experiential exercises; developing and practicing new skills; and small- and large-group dialogues. The session includes the following elements: 1.) Welcome, Introductions, and Goals. 2.) Gender Boxes: To expand gender roles people must first identify the existing roles in society. Participants will brainstorm current stereotypes and roles associated with different gender identities. Next the group will discuss the ways in which such misinformation leads to oppression and contributes to rape culture. 3.) Caucuses: One of the most effective ways to learn how to create inclusive programs is to ask people what helps them feel welcome. Using the diversity within the room, participants will teach and learn from one another about their own experiences of mistreatment due to their gender identity, and what others can do to demonstrate they are welcome and valued. 4.) Ally Skills: Ending sexism and rape culture in a community requires having people with the courage, confidence and skills to respond to misinformed, prejudicial, or hurtful comments in a way that shifts attitudes without shaming, blaming, or isolating others. Participants will work with real-time examples and learn skills for effectively engaging people in reevaluating their comments or behaviors. 5.) Including Youth: Constricting gender messaging starts at birth and bombards people from a very young age. The session will include a discussion of how to be an ally to young people specifically. 6.) Closing: Highlights, goals and evaluations

Learning Outcomes: Upon attending the" Boxed In: How constricting gender roles perpetuate rape culture session" we hope participants will: 1.) Identify and explore their own definitions and constructions of gender. 2.) Consider where these constructions come from as well as their accuracy. 3.) Gain a better understanding of how social constructions of gender contribute to oppression and rape culture. 4.) Learn skills to interrupt manifestations of sexism and limited gender constructions in your community. 5.) Brainstorm how to apply this knowledge to help young people foster a more empowering understanding of gender identity.

Speakers
CM

Claire Michelson, Kim Spurzem, Ben Mincks and Katie Koga

Claire Michelson, Kim Spurzem, Ben Mincks and Katie Koga, NCBI Missoula


Monday November 9, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
UC 327

9:00am

Debriefing The Hunting Ground: A Conversation with Director Kirby Dick
Join Kirby Dick, Director of The Hunting Ground, for a discussion about the film The Hunting Ground.

Speakers
KD

Kirby Dick, Director of The Hunting Ground

Kirby Dick, Director of The Hunting Ground


Monday November 9, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
UC 330/331

9:00am

“Trigger” For Change
Session Description: Theater can be used in many ways to help forward social causes, and many aspects of theater support effective social commentary. This session will look at one particular project, "Trigger" for Change: Theatre as a Tool for Social Dialogue, and its hows and whys, including project construction, community interaction, and its efficacy.

Learning Outcomes: Attendees will learn about the project "Trigger" for Change: Theatre as a Tool for Social Dialogue. This will include basic theories of applied theater, why particular decisions were made for this project, the successful aspects of the project, and things that could be improved.

Speakers
SB

Sydoney Blackmore, Make Your Move! Missoula Applied Theater Prevention Specialist, University of Montana

Sydoney Blackmore, Make Your Move! Missoula Applied Theater Prevention Specialist, University of Montana; Kelly McGuire, Healthy Relationships Project Coordinator, Missoula City-County Relationship Violence Services;  Emma Thorp;  LeShawn George, SARC; Mariah McGarvey; and Sarah Johnson.


Monday November 9, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
UC 332

10:00am

Civil Legal Action for Sexual Assault Survivors
Session Description: This session will examine what civil legal actions are available to sexual assault survivors. It will include a discussion of the types of legal claims that can be asserted. The implications for a survivor if she or he chooses to pursue a civil legal claim will also be discussed. Examples of civil court cases that have been filed will be provided and examined. Public policy and legislative changes involved with civil claims involving sexual assault will also be discussed.

Learning Outcomes: Participants can expect to meet the following learning outcomes: 1. Participants will be able to identify the different types of civil legal claims that can be asserted related to sexual assault. 2. Participants will be able to identify implications for a survivor if she or he chooses to pursue a civil legal claim, including the impact on the survivor's privacy. 3. Participants will be able to discuss current court cases that have been filed related to sexual assault and what the outcome has been. 4. Participants will gain the knowledge enabling them to identify public policy and legislative changes involved with civil claims involving sexual assault.

Speakers
RK

Representative Kimberly Dudik, MT House of Representatives

Representative Kimberly Dudik, MT House of Representatives


Monday November 9, 2015 10:00am - 10:50am
UC 330/331

10:00am

Good Story: How Connection Drives Advocacy, Awareness, and Action
Session Description: People are very hesitant to talk about sexual assault. Discussing statistics, facts, and figures can be met with hostility that quickly ends any attempt at a conversation. What if we changed our approach? Using a narrative format reframes an exchange about sexual assault. This workshop employs character development techniques pulled from movies, media, radio, and screenwriting. These methods create empathy for and connection with those affected by sexual assault by making the issue more relatable. Individuals who were hesitant to have these conversations become more willing to discuss sexual assault and are more open to new ideas about it. This new and exciting way of communicating about sexual assault can be the game changer we need to bring awareness, action and change. Workshop participants will gain practical tools useful in engaging others in meaningful conversations about sexual assault. 

Speakers
TC

Tawnya Cazier, University of Montana

Tawnya Cazier, University of Montana


Monday November 9, 2015 10:00am - 10:50am
UC 327

10:00am

Innovative Approaches to Engaging Campus Partners
Session Description:  Join this student panel for an interactive discussion on new and creative ways to engage their specific population. Moderated by the VOICE Center's Prevention and Education Specialist, you will hear from a student athlete, a student veteran, a sorority member, and a fraternity member on their journey to becoming an active member of their community at MSU. The panelists will discuss the similarities and differences in their particular organizations and share how their values as an organization encourage involvement and leadership. Each student will share experiences on how their group identity influenced their role as a student as well as strategies on connecting with their demographic. The session will conclude with a Q&A portion with the audience.

Learning Outcomes: Discussion participants will walk away with solid ideas and strategies as to engaging these four populations on their campuses or in their communities. -Participants will gain a better understanding as to some of the nuances of these organizations and how that translates into engagement. -Participants will hear straight from the source ways in which these students became engaged and be able to ask questions about working with these populations.

Speakers
JS

Joseph Schumacher, ‎Prevention/Education Specialist at Montana State University VOICE Center

Joseph Schumacher, ‎Prevention/Education Specialist at Montana State University VOICE Center


Monday November 9, 2015 10:00am - 10:50am
UC 332

10:00am

The Rural Institute’s Work to End the Victimization of People with Intellectual Disabilities
Session Description: People with intellectual disabilities (ID) are at increased risk for domestic violence, sexual assault, and other forms of interpersonal violence. Multiple research studies underscore the gravity of the problem of violence against persons with ID. Individuals in this population may be easily targeted for victimization due to a desire to please others, dependence on others for personal assistance, a misperception of the potential offender as a friend and thus underestimating the dangerousness of a situation, and, a difficulty in identifying and labeling their treatment as abusive. Unique risks for sexual assault may include a lack of knowledge about sex and intimate relationships, a desire for a relationship even if abusive, being perceived as 'easy prey,' and being more easily coerced into sexual activities. People with ID who are victimized may have limited ways to get help, access a safe place, or obtain victim services. Community-based domestic violence and sexual assault programs do not uniformly address disability-related abuse nor offer accessible services for crime victims with ID. Clearly, there is a pressing need for educational programs that meet the unique safety-related needs of people with ID. To address this major societal need, UM researchers and colleagues have partnered with people with ID on a ground-breaking project to address IPV in this population. People with intellectual disabilities are involved in every phase of the research. We believe that the participation of people with ID is essential to developing an intervention that is accessible and responsive to unique barriers to safety experienced by people with ID, as well as generating research results perceived to be useful to the community. With underpinnings in self-determination theory, self-efficacy theory, principles of self-advocacy, and the philosophy of independent living, The Safety Class is designed to encourage participants to build their capacity for personal safety. In this presentation, we will describe the community-based participatory research process involved in developing and testing a community-based, multi-session, accessible group safety program for adults with ID. We will also share results of our pilot test and the status of our ongoing, groundbreaking national randomized, controlled evaluation of The Safety Class. The presentation will include a description and examples of how the program addresses self-advocacy, self-care, the nature and dynamics of IPV in the context of ID, safety planning strategies, healthy relationships, communication skills, and self-efficacy skills. It is hypothesized that participants in The Safety Class will report greater improvements than participants in the control group on measures of knowledge of healthy relationships, abuse, safety planning, enhanced safety and communication skills, and safety self-efficacy. If successful, this study will advance the knowledge of disability and violence researchers, victim assistance programs, and disability service providers, regarding ID as a risk factor for IPV and the malleability of self-protective factors through intervention. This project is funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research. Dr. Rosemary B. Hughes, senior research scientist in the Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities at the University of Montana, is the principal investigator.

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge of the nature and scope of interpersonal violence in the context of intellectual disability Understanding the importance of using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach in research on violence against people with intellectual disabilities Understanding the development and evaluation of a group safety intervention for people with intellectual disabilities

Speakers
RH

Rosemary Hughes, PhD, University of Montana Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities Trinity Martel Kaycie Murphy Kelly

Rosemary Hughes, PhD, University of Montana Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities; Trinity Martel; Kaycie Murphy; Kelly Valentine


Monday November 9, 2015 10:00am - 10:50am
UC 326

11:00am

How a Catholic Institution is Addressing Sexual Assault
Session Description: In our presentation we plan to discuss the campus climate survey that was disseminated at Carroll College during the spring of 2015. We will be expanding on our results and we will discuss how we believe we were able to achieve a high participation rate, at approximately forty-five percent of the student body. We believe this participation rate was due to the methods we utilized to present the survey to the student body, which we will further describe in our session. Carroll College has never conducted a formal survey on sexual assault and harassment until this year. As students, we worked alongside three members of the gender studies faculty, Dr. Angel, Dr. Bernardi, and Dr. Dolan, to administer the campus climate survey. Importantly, the survey results will help shape ongoing efforts to improve student safety at Carroll. We will discuss the proactive steps Carroll has begun to take to address the issue of sexual assault on our campus. For example, bystander training has been taught to the newest freshman class and Carroll's largest student groups. Sports teams, community advisors, and other student leaders have all participated in this training. The administration is implementing bystander training across campus this year. During the spring of 2015, the Gender Studies faculty and students organized a sexual harassment panel which included experts from across the state. The panel discussed previous experiences, new motives, and how to report and recognize these situations. Finally, we would like to speak about student-led programs. Carroll students have recently introduced the It's on Us initiative to promote awareness about sexual assault on campus. Carroll faculty are also investigating programs aimed at prevention, such as the development of a peer mentorship program for students. It is imperative that Catholic institutions, like Carroll, work hard to dispel the myth that issues such as sexual assault are not as important or as prevalent as they are at larger colleges and universities. This is why programs to promote awareness and prevention are such an essential part of the Carroll student life.

Learning Outcomes: Attendees will learn about our campus climate survey results and initiatives that our campus is taking to improve student safety. We most want to highlight how we were able to receive a high participation rate for the campus climate survey. We reached out to the faculty to request a small portion of their class time to administer the survey. Many professors recognized the importance of this issue and gladly complied with our request. Administration helped us with promotion of the survey by sending out mass emails for the entire duration of the survey. Posters were hung around campus to increase participation. We believe that students administrating the survey played a huge role in the high participation rate. Student participants were able to recognize the importance of the issue and felt more comfortable with the request coming from their peers. Attendees will also learn about our campus' ongoing efforts toward raising awareness about sexual assault and prevention, as well as future efforts aimed at prevention. Finally, attendees will learn about the unique challenges associated with addressing sexual assault and harassment at a Catholic campus.

Speakers
LS

Lauren Scofield and Elle Barta, Carroll College

Lauren Scofield and Elle Barta, Carroll College


Monday November 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
UC 327

11:00am

Mission Intervention
Session Description: The theatrical space is one of fantasy. People portray characters which find a life of their own in this space, but it is also fleeting. The lives of the characters and the consequences they experience disappear with the applause, making the theatrical space one in which is it safe to experiment and fail. Forum theater for bystander intervention training takes advantage of this safe space, and opens it to audience members to try their hand at intervening in potentially dangerous situations. These attempts are then discussed, which generates a dialogue on effective intervention techniques and new intervention ideas. This session of interactive forum theater will challenge participants to explore the many ways to take action.

Learning Outcomes:  In this session, participants will be exposed to and participate in forum theater for bystander intervention training. In this training, they will create a dialogue about various intervention techniques, why they may or may not be effective, and why they may or may not be good options. Attendees will inherently learn the way forum theater works through participation and observation.

Speakers
SB

Sydoney Blackmore, Make Your Move! Missoula Applied Theater Prevention Specialist, University of Montana

Sydoney Blackmore, Make Your Move! Missoula Applied Theater Prevention Specialist, University of Montana; Kelly McGuire, Healthy Relationships Project Coordinator, Missoula City-County Relationship Violence Services;  Emma Thorp;  LeShawn George, SARC; Mariah McGarvey; and Sarah Johnson.


Monday November 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
UC 326

11:00am

Montana Tech Frontstander Initiative
Session Description: Montana Tech's sexual misconduct prevention programming will be presented. This will include efforts toward awareness and education of our staff, faculty and students of pertinent data from the Spring 2015 Campus Climate Survey and Haven and AlcoholEdu reports. Tools and methods used for education and information dissemination will also be shared. Montana Tech coined the word "Frontstander" in its endeavors to promote a culture of care, safety, and concern. Frontstander is being an Active Bystander and the ultimate goal of Montana Tech programming is that the college community will know what Frontstander symbolizes and will act accordingly.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will learn about Montana Tech's sexual misconduct prevention efforts; challenges and successes.

Speakers
CP

Cricket Pietsch, LCSW, ACSW, Counselor at MT Tech/Highlands College Dr. John Garic, Dean of Highlands College Joyce O’Ne

Cricket Pietsch, MT Tech/Highlands College; Dr. John Garic, Dean of Highlands College; Joyce O’Neill; MT Tech Counselor and Disability Services Coordinator


Monday November 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
UC 330/331

11:00am

Stand Up for Your Peers: Empathy-Building Strategies for Presentations
Session Description: This session will share innovative strategies and activities to building empathy, demonstrate prevalence, and create a more respectful environment for facilitating presentations on interpersonal violence. This presentation will be highly interactive and participants will be encouraged to share their own experiences on their college campuses. Participants will leave this session with tools to begin using in future presentations.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this session, participants will be able to incorporate new activities into their educational presentations to build empathy and create respectful discussion about prevalence and impact within a peer group setting * Identify strategies to encourage participation from various groups across campus

Speakers
JS

Joseph Schumacher, ‎Prevention/Education Specialist at Montana State University VOICE Center

Joseph Schumacher, ‎Prevention/Education Specialist at Montana State University VOICE Center
AS

Alanna Sherstad, MSU VOICE Center Coordinator

Alanna Sherstad, MSU VOICE Center Coordinator


Monday November 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
UC 332

11:50am

1:00pm

Availability of Online Information About Sexual Assault Resources on College Campuses
Session Description: The problem of campus sexual assault has received increased scrutiny in recent years, and in 2014 the White House launched the It's On Us initiative, an awareness campaign aimed at ending sexual assault on college and university campuses. As part of this initiative, colleges and universities have been charged with developing and implementing policies for responding to and preventing sexual assault. The purpose of this research is to examine the extent to which colleges have made information regarding sexual assault available to their campus communities and how easily accessible this information is. Relying on a content analysis approach, we examined the websites of a representative sample of 2- and 4-year colleges and universities across the United States to answer the following questions: (1) What information about sexual assault are colleges and universities making available on their websites? (2) What information about campus and community resources for survivors of sexual assault are colleges and universities making available on their websites? (3) How easy is it to access information about sexual assault and resources for survivors of sexual assault that colleges and universities are making available on their websites? The goal of the study is to understand the extent to which colleges have made information about sexual assault policies and prevention available to their campus communities and identify areas of continued need with regard to these efforts.

Learning Outcomes: Participants can expect to learn the following things: 1) The types of information about sexual assault in general that a representative sample of colleges and universities have made available on their websites 2) The types of information about campus and community resources for survivors of sexual assault that a sample of colleges and universities have made available on their websites 3) The ease with which online information about campus sexual assault can be accessed using the websites of a sample of colleges and universities 4) Areas of continued need with regard to college and university presentation and availability of online information about sexual assault and resources for survivors of sexual assault

Speakers
DJ

Dr. Jennifer Scroggins, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Montana State University Billings and Carissa Sorenson

Dr. Jennifer Scroggins, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Montana State University Billings and Carissa Sorenson


Monday November 9, 2015 1:00pm - 1:50pm
UC 327

1:00pm

Art for Change: An art experiential for social norms change

Session Description: Please join art therapist, Dr. Kim Brown Campbell, for a discussion about using the visual arts to facilitate social norms change around the issue of interpersonal violence and sexual assault prevention and education.  Participants will engage in an art making experiential to complete individual "peace flags" that will be hung in unity at the end of the event to commemorate Not In Our State and our efforts to support survivors. The peace flags will serve to visually continue the dialogue surrounding prevention and education of all forms of interpersonal violence.  


Speakers
KB

Kimberly Brown Campbell, EdD, LCPC, ATR, Campus Assault Prevention Coordinator, University of Montana and art therapist

Kimberly Brown Campbell, EdD, LCPC, ATR, Campus Assault Prevention Coordinator, University of Montana and art therapist in private practice


Monday November 9, 2015 1:00pm - 2:50pm
UC 326

1:00pm

Sexual Assault in Montana; Fact, Fiction, and Future
Session Description: Missoula's in the spotlight. We've witnessed a national focus on sexual assault in our State, specifically revolving around assaults that occur on university campuses or involving university students, but what is the truth about college rape? What is fiction? And, where are we going? The reality is that sexual assault is a problem that affects more than just students. A 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey found that nearly 1 in 5 women and 1 in 71 men have been raped at some point in their lives. The United States Department of Justice reports that American Indians (who make up approximately 8% of the Montana population) are 2.5 times more likely to experience sexual assault crimes than other races and that 1 in 3 American Indian women report having been raped or having been the victim of an attempted rape in her lifetime. Along with these statistics, Montana's sexual assault laws, regulations, and policies have evolved piecemeal over the years, and there are Montanans leading the way in training, cooperation between many governmental agencies, and committed to the necessary changes to prevent and respond to sexual assault in our communities. 


Speakers
RE

Representative Ellie Hill Joel Thompson, Department of Justice, Prosecution Services Kirsten Pabst, Missoula County Atto

Representative Ellie Hill; Joel Thompson, Department of Justice, Prosecution Services; Kirsten Pabst, Missoula County Attorney; Senator Diane Sands, Chair of Interim Committee of Law and Justice; Lucy France University of Montana Office of Legal Counsel; Jim Taylor, Montana ACLU, Legal Director


Monday November 9, 2015 1:00pm - 2:50pm
UC 330/331

2:00pm

Scream with Me Now: Music as a tool for generating awareness about relationship violence and sexual assault
Session Description: Jamie Wyman combines her anti-violence experience with a live performance of her music to lead this interactive workshop. Participants will be asked to focus on the goals of the summit, of their work in general, and for their own lives.  Together we will explore roadblocks to change (intrapersonal, interpersonal, systemic) while also imagining what real, lasting change would feel like.  As Jamie performs her music, participants will illustrate their collective goals in a chalk mural, creating a physical representation.  As a community we have the answers to ending violence.  If we focus on the positive goals, we still acknowledge that the problems exist, but we give them less power.  Like John Lennon’s “Imagine” and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream,” we must truly be able to imagine the outcome we want in order to make it a reality.  The aim of this workshop is to leave participants with a clear focus on their goals and a renewed energy to move forward with creative passion in their anti-violence work.

Speakers
JW

Jamie Wyman, JD, MA, Singer-Songwriter & Catalyst

Jamie Wyman, JD, MA, Singer-Songwriter & Catalyst


Monday November 9, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
UC 332

2:50pm

Climate Surveys: Development and Discoveries
Session Description: Climate Surveys are recommended or required in the latest White House task force material on addressing University Sexual Assault (Not Alone, White House Task Force Report, April, 2014). This symposium will discuss UM's development and analysis of findings of the recommended Climate Survey conducted on campus for the last 2 years. Presentations will focus on: Development and Discoveries in the use of Climate Survey in the following sub-presentations: How to Develop, Summarize and Understand your Campus Climate (Fiore); Findings and Application of Educational Questions of University of Montana Campus Climate Survey (UMCCS) (Costanzo); Possibilities in Developing Specific Follow-up and Studies from Climate Survey (Grove); Comparing and Understanding Student's Knowledge and Attitudes (Pepper); What does Incidence Data on Experiences tell us and not tell us? (Peatee & Jurasek). These five presentations will increase understanding about how to maximize our use of the information that students generously offer us by voluntarily taking the climate survey on our campuses. conducting climate surveys can provide campuses with a wide range of information about knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of students and guide future programming, communications and efforts to address sexual violence on campus. By exploring U of M's experience with the survey and examining meaningful findings, this presentation can help look at ways to use date to enhance programming, responsiveness, and services for students. Finally, it is also important to understand the limitations of surveys and what surveys aren't able to tell you about your students, and the best alternative means to explore more deeply what is important to addressing campus climate when seeking to understand sexual violence on college campuses.

Learning Outcomes:  Participants who attend this workshop will learn: 1) Important information on the use of campus climate surveys. 2) The ways climate survey data can guide further questions and ideas for further exploration. 3) How climate survey data can be helpful in guiding educational programming. 4) Understanding what knowledge and attitude data tells us about attitudes and culture change work ahead. 5) The strengths and limitations of campus climate surveys.

Speakers
CF

Christine Fiore, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Montana Marina Costanzo Lindsey Grove Alison Pepper Jessic

Christine Fiore, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Montana; Marina Costanzo; Lindsey Grove; Alison Pepper; Jessica Peatee; Elise Jurascheck


Monday November 9, 2015 2:50pm - 4:00pm
UC 332

2:50pm

Trauma Informed Response - Beyond Just the Facts Ma'am
Session Descriptin: Do you understand the difference between lying and the effects of trauma on a person’s ability to describe events? This presentation helps criminal justice and other professionals professionals understand basic scientific concepts concerning the neurobiology of trauma so that victims of traumatic crimes will be understood, increasing the success of sexual assault cases.

Speakers
DK

Donna Kelly, Utah Prosecutor and Detective Justin Boardman

Donna Kelly, Utah Prosecutor and Detective Justin Boardman


Monday November 9, 2015 2:50pm - 4:00pm
UC 327

2:50pm

Your Montana Legislature Addressing Sexual Violence
Session Description: This session looks more specifically to the future legislative action for the next Montana legislative session.

Speakers
SD

Senator Diane Sands, Chair of Interim Committee of Law and Justice Senator Mary Sheehy Moe Senator Sue Malek Representat

Senator Diane Sands, Chair of Interim Committee of Law and Justice; Senator Mary Sheehy Moe; Senator Sue Malek; Representative Ellie Hill and Representative Kimberly Dudik


Monday November 9, 2015 2:50pm - 4:00pm
UC 330/331

4:10pm

Keynote Address: From the NFL to College Campuses, Working Together to Make Our Communities Safer
Session Description: From the NFL to College Campuses, Working Together to Make Our Communities Safer will present material on how the NFL decided to respond to issues related to domestic violence and sexual assault, and how that work can be expanded in local communities and on college campuses to change the culture of violence that is either ignored or condoned to make all of our communities safer.

Speakers
RS

Rita Smith, senior advisor for the National Football League, an advisor with Precise Advisory Group and consultant on ot

Rita Smith, senior advisor for the National Football League, an advisor with Precise Advisory Group and consultant on other projects as a national expert on violence against women.


7:00pm

 
Tuesday, November 10
 

8:00am

Continental Breakfast
Continental breakfast will be provided for attendees who registered at least 72 hours in advance of the summit. 

9:00am

Alcohol and Sexual Assault: Unpacking the Connections and Practical Implications for Prevention
Session Description: The strong and varied connections between student alcohol use and sexual assault will be presented, highlighting the critical need and myriad opportunities to shift the focus from victim behavior to perpetrator accountability. This will be followed by strategies underscoring the importance of collaborative and mutually reinforcing prevention efforts between alcohol and sexual assault prevention practitioners.

Learning Outcomes: As a result of the training, participants will be able to: - understand existing and emerging research associating alcohol use and sexual assault - recall factors related to alcohol's role in sexual assault perpetration and victimization - speak to the vast and varied dynamics related to alcohol's relationship to sexual assault - employ co-curricular prevention strategies to address alcohol and sexual assault

Speakers
RB

Robert Buelow, Vice President, Higher Education Partner Education at EverFi

Robert Buelow, Vice President, Higher Education Partner Education at EverFi


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
UC 326

9:00am

Forum Theater: Theory and How-To
Session Description: Theater has been used for commentary on societies' issues since it's first documentation in the 5th century BCE, and theater exists in every known culture. Theater can be used to affect great change within any community that utilizes it. This session is an introduction to the theories and types of theater that do something about social issues. We will also look into the logistics of building theater programming on college campuses. This session is interactive!

Learning Outcomes:  In this session, participants will learn the basic theories of theater that support awareness, education, dialogue, and practice, and the types of theater that support these goals best. Participants will also be introduced to the logistics of and ways to build theater programming to address pertinent issues. They will also briefly collaborate with other participants to build "dream theater programming" for their community, and receive audience feedback about these dream plans.

Speakers
SB

Sydoney Blackmore, Make Your Move! Missoula Applied Theater Prevention Specialist, University of Montana

Sydoney Blackmore, Make Your Move! Missoula Applied Theater Prevention Specialist, University of Montana; Kelly McGuire, Healthy Relationships Project Coordinator, Missoula City-County Relationship Violence Services;  Emma Thorp;  LeShawn George, SARC; Mariah McGarvey; and Sarah Johnson.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
UC 332

9:00am

Not In Our House Year Three: Trials and Triumphs
Session Description: The Not In Our House Taskforce is a super-organization at Montana State University that is comprised of over 40 separate student organizations including Athletics, Clubs, and Fraternity/Sorority Life. Growing out of the Not In Our State Summit in 2013, Not In Our House (NIOH) dedicated themselves to continuing the conversation on preventing interpersonal violence throughout the academic year. Now in it's third year, NIOH has had it's share of ups and downs but is learning from the lessons of the first two years and is poised for record membership. This unique organization has proven to be an excellent way to continue and expand the conversations started at the statewide level down to the community, and on our campus. Come learn about the origins of this organization, it's accomplishments and lessons learned, and receive a template for starting a NIOH Taskforce on your campus.
Learning Outcomes: Participants will walk away with a template and strategy for beginning campus-wide culture change through inter-organizational collaboration.

Speakers
JS

Joseph Schumacher, ‎Prevention/Education Specialist at Montana State University VOICE Center

Joseph Schumacher, ‎Prevention/Education Specialist at Montana State University VOICE Center


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
UC 330/331

9:00am

State Legislative Responses to Sexual Assault on University Campuses
Session Description: This session will provide an overview of the legislative efforts in state legislatures to address sexual assault on university campuses. A description of legislation multiple states have enacted will be provided. This legislation will deal with prevention, investigation, and proper response when an assault occurs. Work from the Justice Center of the Council of State Governments and other national legislative groups will be discussed.

Learning Outcomes: Participants will have the following outcomes: 1. Gain knowledge of what different state legislatures have done in response to sexual assault on university campuses. 2. Be able to identify effective legislative response strategies to be implemented in other states regarding sexual assault on university campuses. 3. Gain knowledge and tools that will enable participants to propose and advocate for policy changes to address sexual assault on university campuses.

Speakers
RK

Representative Kimberly Dudik, MT House of Representatives

Representative Kimberly Dudik, MT House of Representatives


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:00am - 9:50am
UC 327

10:00am

Dialogue: Overused Word, Cliché Idea, Essential Activity
Session Description: "Dialogue" is a worn-out, prosaic word often used in politics and social activism. However, it really is essential to the betterment of society. Why is effective dialogue important? What can it do that nothing else can? What are the necessary elements? How can one build a safe space so that people may say what they think, feel, and perceive in a respectful fashion? This session will explore these questions. Please come prepared to move and participate. This session is interactive!

Learning Outcomes: This session will be a unique and immersive look into the nature and importance of dialogue. Participants should come prepared to learn from everyone in the room.

Speakers
SB

Sydoney Blackmore, Make Your Move! Missoula Applied Theater Prevention Specialist, University of Montana

Sydoney Blackmore, Make Your Move! Missoula Applied Theater Prevention Specialist, University of Montana; Kelly McGuire, Healthy Relationships Project Coordinator, Missoula City-County Relationship Violence Services;  Emma Thorp;  LeShawn George, SARC; Mariah McGarvey; and Sarah Johnson.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:00am - 10:50am
UC 327

10:00am

Sovereignty, Justice and Truth….the journey of a Native Woman who is sexual assaulted
Speakers
TP

Toni Plummer-Alvernaz, Executive Director at Montana Native Women's Coalition

Toni Plummer-Alvernaz, Executive Director at Montana Native Women's Coalition


Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:00am - 10:50am
UC 332

10:00am

Step Up: Student-Led Bystander Intervention Program

Session Description: Step UP! is a prosocial behavior and bystander intervention program that educates students to be proactive in helping others, in a variety of situations. Teaching people about the determinants of prosocial behavior makes them more aware of why they sometimes don’t help. As a result they are more likely to help in the future.The Residence Life Office at the University of Montana has trained 7 full-time staff and 10 student staff to be Step Up! Facilitators. This team of facilitators is currently implementing the Step Up! Program into our educational approach within Residence Life. This will include trainings for students, informational bulletin boards, passive programs, and other educational tools within residence life. Step Up! was originally developed by the University of Arizona and now has 395 partner universities using this educational program, including MSU-Billings.

The goals of Step UP! are to:

  • Raise awareness of helping behaviors
  • Increase motivation to help
  • Develop skills and confidence when responding to problems or concerns
  • Ensure the safety and well-being of self and others

 


Speakers
RM

Ryan MacNeill, Brandi Bruno and Erika Karcher, University of Montana Residence Life

Ryan MacNeill, Brandi Bruno and Erika Karcher; University of Montana Residence Life


Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:00am - 10:50am
UC 330/331

10:00am

Working with Offenders of Interpersonal Violence
Speakers
BB

Brad Boylan, LCPC

Brad Boylan, LCPC


Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:00am - 10:50am
UC 326

11:00am

CANCELLED
Session Description: 

Research suggests that victim anxiety can be reduced prior to a forensic rape exam through providing clear explanations and building trust. However, as the victim faces complex feelings of powerlessness, frustration, confusion, and sadness, the amount of information conveyed during this time can exacerbate their distress. When intervening during this crisis period, we may want to restore order and take control. But how can we effectively help an overwhelmed client without making choices for them?

 Workshop participants will become acquainted with a methodology that quickly builds rapport and trust, and is easily implemented. Grounded in a customer service model, these flexible guidelines lay the groundwork for effective communication in the midst of a crisis intervention. The positive or negative interactions during this phase will impact a client’s overall perception of their experience. Our actions in this situation are crucial as they will have lasting effects. Employing these techniques seeks to lessen anxiety while helping the victim feel supported and empowered in the aftermath of a sexual assault.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
UC 326

11:00am

Military Sexual Trauma
Session Description: Thanks to the hard work of survivors and advocates across the country, the military has made several minor strides in the last few years regarding military sexual trauma, or MST. However, it continues to lag behind in some significant ways in its handling of these cases. This presentation will be given by a United States Marine Corps veteran and survivor, and will discuss the role of culture, current statistics, reporting and prosecution procedures, as well as legislation attempts to further improve the process for survivors.

Learning Outcomes: How the military currently handles military sexual trauma cases - Resources available for survivors - How cultural reform affects incidents and prevalence of sexual violence in closed-system cultures - Legislation which seeks to address these issues

Speakers
SA

Sarah Albertson, Marine Corps veteran, survivor, and MSU graduate student

Sarah Albertson, Marine Corps veteran, survivor, and MSU graduate student


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
UC 332

11:00am

Victim’s Perspective of Their Roles in Unwanted Sexual Experiences When Alcohol is Consumed
Session Description: Sexual violence among college students is recognized as a serious public health concern in the United States. Among college students, sexual violence is associated with high levels of PTSD symptoms and psychological consequences (Frazier et al., 2009). For ages 18 to 25 sexual violence is the only crime that is found to occur more frequently among college students than the same age group not attending college and is at its highest rate during the first year of attendance(Baum & Klaus, 2005) Research has already uncovered increased risk of victimization for young college students including heavy alcohol consumption (Messman-Moore, Coates, Gaffey, & Johnson, 2008), acquaintance with the perpetrator (B. Mason & Smithey, 2012), and previous victimization (Classen, Palesh, & Aggarwal, 2005; Messman-Moore & Brown, 2006). Although these risk factors are already recognized, it is still unknown how alcohol specifically affects the victim’s perception of the experience. What the victim attributes to the circumstance involving alcohol may be important for greater understanding. With low report rates (40%, Truman & Planty, 2012), and an even lower acknowledgment of crime rate (25%, Cleere & Lynn, 2013) and high rates of alcohol consumption of either the perpetrator or victim prior to sexual violence (50%, Abbey, Ross, McDuffie, & McAuslan, 1996), it is important to understand how influential the voluntary consumption of alcohol is on a female's perception of her role in the unwanted sexual experience. Bystanders perceive that the victim has more responsibility when alcohol is involved (Girard & Senn, 2008). Therefore, if victims have similar perceptions they may fail to recognize a crime occurred, be less likely to seek social support, and feel responsibility, shame/embarrassment, or guilt for the sexual violence. This research project was derived from a campus wide Safe Campus Survey that was disseminated in the fall of 2014. Thirty-six students reported experiencing a sexual assault in the past year or since attending the university and completed the specific unwanted sexual experiences survey. Logistic regression and Chi-Square Test for Association were utilized to test the relationships between the victim's perception of intoxication on their likelihood to tell someone about the assault, feelings of responsibility, perception of a crime occurring, and shame/embarrassment or guilt. Significant associations were found with feelings of responsibility and perception of a crime, with and without the control for physical force. Future directions and limitations are discussed.

Learning Outcomes: Participants can expect to learn about the personal perceptions of victims and how they differ depending on whether alcohol was involved in the unwanted sexual experience or not. Hypotheses were derived based on the Internalized Oppression Model. If victims are told by social supports and the general society that drinking alcohol contributed to their unwanted sexual experience then victims may internalize that belief and contribute more blame to themselves.

Speakers
LG

Lindsey Grove, Psychology PhD Candidate, University of Montana

Lindsey Grove, Psychology PhD Candidate, University of Montana


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:50am
UC 327

11:50am

1:00pm

Integrating Bystander Intervention in the Humanities Classroom
Session Description: This session will look at how to integrate bystander intervention into the Humanities classroom as part of a broad-based program of curricular infusion. As part of The University of Montana's multi-faceted efforts to address campus sexual and gender-based violence, we have implemented bystander intervention trainings for all interested parties with a particular focus on Residence Life, ROTC, Athletics, and student groups. The trainings are not mandatory for all students, so many of the students in my classes have not participated in them. In the Spring Semester of 2014, I started researching how I could reach students who would never be exposed to bystander intervention trainings. Through this research, I realized that bystander intervention techniques could be a useful lens for analyzing problematic texts from the Western Literary Canon. In our bystander-intervention training model (Bringing in the Bystander), we u se the "Scope of Inappropriate Behaviors" and "The Pyramid of Hate" to talk about the continuum of gender-based violence. These tools demonstrate how low-risk, high-frequency behaviors such as stereotyping and sexist jokes contribute to rape culture and sexual/gender-based violence. In our trainings, we identify these low-risk, high frequency behaviors as the best and safest place to intervene along the continuum of violence. We use scenarios such as "you're sitting on your residence hall steps with some friends who start cat-calling women who walk by" and then ask students to brainstorm intervention techniques. In the past, when I thought about how these bystander intervention techniques could be used in the classroom, I had always considered giving students the tools to intervene when someone in the classroom made similarly inappropriate comments. But what if those inappropriate comments and attitudes don't come from the people in the classroom, but from the texts and authors assigned? How can we effectively intervene in those situations and give students tools to read these texts in meaningful ways that acknowledge the issue of gender-based violence? I started to wonder if the methods we use to intervene when we hear sexist, racist, or homophobic jokes today could also be used to read and understand misogynistic texts such as 15th-century Witch Hunter's Manual, the Malleus Maleficarum. In this session, I will look at how statements and attitudes we analyze in bystander intervention trainings like: 1) Boys Will Be Boys; 2) #NotAllMen; and 3) But He's Such a Nice Guy have parallels with what students encounter in assigned texts and classroom discussions centered on the Western Literary Canon. Further, I will offer pedagogical techniques for intervening in the classroom to address the misogyny and violence we find in some classical litera ture. Lastly, I will discuss the effectiveness of these techniques over the past two years of implementing them in the classroom.

Learning Outcomes: 1) Participants will learn about an innovative method of infusing bystander intervention into the university curriculum. 2) Participants will learn bystander techniques and activities to use in the classroom. 3) Participants will learn about the positive student reaction to the use of these techniques.

Speakers
EH

Elizabeth Hubble, PhD Director of Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies, University of Montana

Elizabeth Hubble, PhD; Director of Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies, University of Montana


Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:00pm - 1:50pm
UC 327

1:00pm

Art for Change: An art experiential for social norms change
Session Description: Please join art therapist, Dr. Kim Brown Campbell, for a discussion about using the visual arts to facilitate social norms change around the issue of interpersonal violence and sexual assault prevention and education.  Participants will engage in an art making experiential to complete individual "peace flags" that will be hung in unity at the end of the event to commemorate Not In Our State and our efforts to support survivors. The peace flags will serve to visually continue the dialogue surrounding prevention and education of all forms of interpersonal violence.  

Speakers
KB

Kimberly Brown Campbell, EdD, LCPC, ATR, Campus Assault Prevention Coordinator, University of Montana and art therapist

Kimberly Brown Campbell, EdD, LCPC, ATR, Campus Assault Prevention Coordinator, University of Montana and art therapist in private practice


Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:00pm - 2:50pm
UC 326

1:00pm

A Revolution in Trauma Informed Victim Interviews
Session Description: West Valley City Police Department and the Utah Prosecution Council have created and implemented a new protocol for sexual assault cases incorporating the principles of the neurobiology of trauma. This presentation is fast paced and interactive and focusses on the how-to’s of doing a trauma-informed victim interview, including video clips from real sexual assault interviews.

Speakers
DK

Donna Kelly, Utah Prosecutor and Detective Justin Boardman

Donna Kelly, Utah Prosecutor and Detective Justin Boardman


Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:00pm - 2:50pm
UC 330/331

2:00pm

Positive Action: Volunteer Based Initiatives at the University of Montana
Session Description: Members of the Student Advocacy Resource Center (SARC) and Advocates for Non-Violence (ANV) would like to discuss some of the efforts that have been made to reform the image and environment of the University of Montana and the Missoula community. Both the University of Montana and the City of Missoula have recently received national attention after being dubbed "The Rape Capital of the United States." We would like to highlight some of the ways in which we are reshaping the conversation around issues such as sexual assault and consent. Rather than emphasizing behaviors which are not to be engaged in, which can simultaneously alienate men and blame victims, we would like to share our strategies for engaging everyone by empowering them with the knowledge and skills necessary to create positive social change. Our presentation will provide an overview of the different events sponsored by SARC, ANV and Make Your Move over the past year which were used to facilitate outreach, increase awareness and encourage activism. We will also discuss the importance of working closely with other groups on campus and within the Missoula community. We would like to share some of our strategies for coalition building with the participants of the Not In Our State Sexual Assault Summit. We hope to share some of our experiences working with our campus and community to address issues such as sexual assault and consent while simultaneously facilitating a discussion around what other campuses and communities are working on. Our goal is for participants who attend our session to obtain new strategies for interacting with members of their community and encouraging volunteer engagement. We are also very excited to learn about the work which is being performed by other groups and organizations throughout our state.

Learning Outcomes: What can participants expect to learn: -The variety of programs that University of Montana has been using to address interpersonal violence. -Ways for engaging members in their community. -How to develop programs with a focus on what people can do, rather than what they should not do. -Ways of collaborating with other groups in your community. -Difficulties that we have faced, and how we plan to overcome them in the future.

Speakers
CO

Chris O’Bleness, Advocates for Non-Violence, University of Montana

Chris O’Bleness, Advocates for Non-Violence, University of Montana


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:00pm - 2:50pm
UC 327

2:50pm

How to Develop a Comprehensive Community Campaign to End Sexual Violence

Session description: Interested in starting a community campaign, but not sure how to start? Members of Make Your Move! Advisory Council will give a behind-the-scenes look at how Missoula’s comprehensive community campaign to end sexual violence was developed. Make Your Move! | End Sexual Violence is an innovative campaign to engage men and women as “bystanders,” working as allies to prevent sexual violence in the greater Missoula area. This multi-faceted, interagency approach will create long-term, positive change in targeted communities by changing the beliefs and behaviors that support sexual violence, thus creating a safer and healthier community. The campaign was founded in 2012 and is currently coordinated by a coalition of members that include Missoula City-County Relationship Violence Services, YWCA Missoula, and representatives from the University of Montana, including the Campus Assault Prevention Coordinator, the Student Advocacy Resource Center (SARC), and Curry Health Center Wellness.

The campaign has three main components:

  • Advertising:
    • Posters in bathroom stalls
    • Newspaper advertisements
    • 30 second movie theater advertisement
    • Online advertisements on MissoulaEvents.net and Facebook
    • Bookmarks distributed to local bookstores to be included in sales of “Missoula” by Jon Krakauer
  • Community member participation:
    • Taking photos of community members holding signs with their best move to end sexual violence
    • Use of a Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/MakeYourMoveMissoula) to engage community members in discussion about sexual violence
  • Community trainings:
    • Workshops for university students and community members
    • Workshops for bar staff on how to protect their patrons from sexual violence
    • “Bar blasts” utilizing volunteers to educate bar patrons and engage them in the photo campaign
    • Interactive theater workshop model being developed in Fall 2015

 Make Your Move’s poster campaign has been replicated by 14 communities around the world and has been featured on Upworthy and Jezebel. 

Learning outcomes:

Participants will learn strategies for creating and launching an effective community campaign, including:

  • Partnering between universities and community organizations
  • How to engage stakeholders and leverage resources
  • How to collaborate to eliminate duplication and increase efficiency
  • Where to cut corners and where to bring in professionals
  • Principles of effective social marketing and prevention strategies

Speakers
LF

Leah Fitch, Outreach Coordinator at Missoula Forum for Children and Youth, and Kelly McGuire, Missoula Healthy Relations

Leah Fitch, Outreach Coordinator at Missoula Forum for Children and Youth, and Kelly McGuire, Missoula Healthy Relationship Project Coordinator


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:50pm - 4:00pm
UC 332

2:50pm

Sing Our Rivers Red Montana Project
Session Description: The Sing Our Rivers Red (SORR) organization aims to bring awareness to the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women and colonial gender based violence in the United States and Canada. The events strive to raise consciousness, unite ideas and demand action for Indigenous women, girls, Two Spirit and LGBTQQIA people who have been murdered or gone missing, tortured, raped, trafficked, and assaulted, who have not had the proper attention or justice. SORR also is being planned in solidarity and with collaborative spirit, meant to support the efforts built in Canada, as well as highlight the need for awareness and action to address colonial gender violence in the United States. Sing Our Rivers Red organization recognizes that each of us has a voice to not only speak out about the injustices against our sisters, but also use the strength of those voices to sing for our healing. Water is the source of life and so are women. We ne ed to Sing Our Rivers Red to remember the missing and murdered and those who are metaphorically drowning in injustices. We are connecting our support through the land and waters across the border. More than 1,181 Native women and girls have been reported missing or have been murdered in Canada since 1980. There is not a comprehensive estimate of Indigenous women who are missing and murdered in the United States, but, many factors contribute to this epidemic such fear, stigma, legal barriers, racism, sexism, and the devastating levels of violence in the US. According to the US Department of Justice, nearly half of all Native American women have been raped, beaten, or stalked by an intimate partner. Native American women are 2.5 times more likely to experience sexual assault crimes compared to all other races. One in three Native American women will be raped in her lifetime; and on some reservations, women are murdered at a rate 10 times higher than the national average. For over 20 years there have been marches, events and awareness raising efforts each year throughout Canada on Valentine's Day, such as the Women's Memorial March, the Stolen Sisters movement, Sisters in Spirit, Families of Sisters in Spirit, the Walking With Our Sisters exhibit, creating a community-led database and map, such as the Highway of Tears, and using media via the #MMIW and #ItEndsHere hashtags. This spring the Sing Our Rivers Red exhibit was hosted across the state of Montana to raise awareness for our Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women. In each community stories were shared of loved ones that had been murdered or were missing. The goal of the Sing Our Rivers Red Montana Project is to remember our women that have been lost and bring forward their stories. The session will be a sewing circle to create an exhibit for the state of Montana with the vision of the exhibit to travelling to all the Montana reservations and the Little Shell community.

Learning Outcomes: Through participating in the sewing circle participants will learn more about issues related to murdered and missing indigenous women in the United States and Canada.

Speakers
RA

Ruth A. Swaney, Program Coordinator - Native American Natural Resource Program Heather Cahoon, Annie Belcourt, Maegan Ri

Ruth A. Swaney, Program Coordinator - Native American Natural Resource Program; Heather Cahoon, Annie Belcourt, Maegan Rides At The Door, Shane Sangrey, Anna Whiting-Sorrell, Gyda Swaney, Michael Munson, and Kathy Little Leaf.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:50pm - 4:00pm
UC 327

2:50pm

StopSlut: Bringing SLUT: The Play to Montana
Session Description: In late summer 2014, the Feminist Press at the CUNY contacted the UM Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program about working together to stage a nationally recognized play addressing the aftermath of a sexual assault in a high school. A working group was formed with UM faculty, advocates, students, and community members. This group found funding, a director, and a producer. The director and the producer found a venue and a group of actors from area Missoula high schools to stage the play which will be performed in mid-October 2015 at the Crystal Theater in Missoula, MT. SLUT: The Play, written by Katie Cappiello, was inspired by the real experiences of high school students and developed over two years with teenage actors in weekly creative sessions led by The Arts Effect in New York City. The play follows the journey of 16-year-old Joanna Del Marco who is sexually assaulted by three friends during a night out in NYC, and highlights the damaging impact of slut culture on the lives of young people and the importance of being heard. Teen Vogue wrote, "A group of high schoolers are making waves with an original production called SLUT, leading the charge to stop slut-shaming for good." The play is an innovative addition to the ongoing efforts at university campuses and high schools across the nation to address the issue of rape and sexual assault. Using theater opens up new avenues for prevention and brings new audiences to those efforts. This session will take play one month after the staging of the play. The session will bring together the director, the production team, and the actors to discuss their experiences with the play. The panel will focus on how theater can be an effective force to address rape culture. In addition, the cast and crew will discuss their experiences staging their play, and what it means to them.

Learning Outcomes: Summit participants will: 1) learn how theater can be an effective force to address rape culture. 2) learn strategies for addressing slut-shaming. 3) learn about resources for presenting SLUT and/or other applied theater programs at their campuses.

Speakers
HB

Hillary Bard, Chris Torma and Hannah Ettema, SLUT: The Play

Hillary Bard, Director; Chris Torma and Hannah Ettema, Producer, SLUT: The Play


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:50pm - 4:00pm
UC 326

3:00pm

Student Networking
Session Description: This is an opportunity for students from across MUS to meet and network. 

Moderators
CO

Chris O’Bleness, Advocates for Non-Violence, University of Montana

Chris O’Bleness, Advocates for Non-Violence, University of Montana